How To Stop an In-Store “I want this” Tantrum Before it Starts

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15 Responses

  1. Rory says:

    What a great idea, Eric. I have yet to try this one because Beth is not too “expectant” in the shops. This might have something to do with the fact that we use toy shops as play areas – she plays with the toys, pressing the buttons, dancing to the music, etc. and then eventually it’s time to go…or she gets fed up.

    Of course, you know I’m bias because I love How To Talk So Kids Will Listen. But it is good to read an example of this method working so effectively.

    Hey, you should enter this into Babylune’s Parenting Mistakes Group Writing Project. Get yourself a link and a few more visitors.

  2. Eric says:

    Thanks Rory for the positive feedback.

    I entered the post into the group writing project upon your suggestion. thanks

  3. Jan says:

    I have to agree with Rory. This is a great suggestion. I am definitely going to try this next time we go to store.

    I like your posts. Keep up the good work.

  4. Great Idea, Eric. I’ll try it soon. Thanks for sharing and wish u all the best.

  5. Eric says:

    Jan, Julia welcome. I would love to get feedback from everyone who’s tried it.

  6. David says:

    This relates to a general tip on saying “No” that I read in the recent parenting book ‘Raise Your Kids without Raising Your Voice’.

    The author suggests that one should always avoid using the specific word “No” as a response. This seemed strange to me at first, until she gives an example scenario, asking which response one would prefer (I will attempt to paraphrase it from memory):

    Husband: How would you like to go out for dinner tonight dear?
    Wife: No.

    -or-

    Husband: How would you like to go out for dinner tonight dear?
    Wife: That would be so nice, but I’m really exhausted. Could we take a raincheck?

    In all honesty, which response would we prefer? It’s no different with our kids – they’re people too, and simply treating them as such, without apologetics or pandering, will garner a better response without undermining our parental authority.

    Here’s a link to the book which I’ve really found useful:
    Raise Your Kids Without Raising Your Voice

  7. Eric says:

    Hey David, thanks for commenting. That book is really great and I plan on writing about it in a future post. There’s a lot of great information in there.

  8. Genesis says:

    Good tip! I wonder if it will work on an 18 month old?

    I have to read that book, I have the other one by the same authors, “Siblings Without Rivalry” and it is excellent. The only problem is finding a copy in English down here in Guatemala!

  9. Eric says:

    I hope you 18 month old doesnt have 3yr old sized tantrums. That would be pretty tough. Wouldnt it just be easier to carry the 18 month old out of the store and distract him/her with something else?

  10. tovorinok says:

    Hello

    Great book. I just want to say what a fantastic thing you are doing! Good luck!

    G’night

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